READING ACTIVITIES

Snuggle up with a favorite story and use these activities to practice speech and language skills while doing so.

  • Articulation: If the story is being read aloud to the student, have them listen closely for their speech sound(s) in words and raise their hand, stomp, or clap each time they hear their sound. If reading independently, have the student highlight, circle, or place a sticker above each word that starts with their sound.
  • Expressive/ Receptive Language: Following an open discussion and viewing of the pictures in the storybook (if applicable), have the student answer "WH" questions (Who, What, When, Where) pertaining to the story, the characters, and the setting. Additionally, ask the student to sequence three story events and tell what happened in the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
  • Fluency: Encourage the student to fill their belly with air and use slow, easy speech to answer "WH" questions (Who, What, When, Where) pertaining to the story, the characters, and the setting. Additionally, ask the student to sequence three story events and tell what happened in the beginning, middle, and end of the story using smooth speech.

"I Spy"

Play a traditional game of "I Spy" while practicing speech and language skills.

  • Articulation: Have the student find five objects around the home that start with their speech sound. 
  • Expressive Language: Have the student provide "hints" by describing objects around the home. See if others are able to guess what the objects are based from the descriptions. 
  • Receptive Language: Provide "hints" or descriptions of objects around the home, and have the student try to guess the object based on the descriptions provided.
  • Fluency: Encourage the student to fill their belly with air and use slow, easy speech to describe objects around the home. See if others are able to guess what the objects are. 

ALTERNATIVE ACTIVITIES 

Alternative activities for students with emerging verbal language.

  • Articulation: Sing a favorite nursery rhyme, such as the Alphabet Song, The Itsy Bitsy Spider, or whatever song your child enjoys.
  • Articulation: Clap out syllables together in multi-syllabic words such as: banana, unicorn, basketball, bicycle, and broccoli.
  • Receptive Language: During mealtimes, help your child point to the items on their plate as an adult names the food items.
  • Expressive Language: During mealtimes, have your little one name the food items on their plate as an adult points.